Victoria University Student Research paper Published in the American Journal of Pediatrics

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The research authored by Baru Ruth Sharon Apio a student in the Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Victoria University Kampala Uganda shared Stunting facts in Children in Uganda and how the problem can be prevented in detail.

Published on August 4, gives Data from the 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey used to identify possible socio-economic inequalities in stunting among 3941 children aged 6-59 months.

also the research tackled Multivariate binary logistic regression models were fitted to calculate the odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals for stunting by maternal formal education and household wealth index.

Read below;

HOW TO PREVENT STUNTING AMONG CHILDREN – RESEARCH Victoria University has proudly shared their research paper that was published in the American Journal of Pediatrics. Notably, this research was conducted by the Victoria University student is known as Baru Ruth Sharon Apio.

Socio-economic status is an important predictor of stunting, however, published population-based studies on socioeconomic inequalities in stunting among children under-five years of age is scarce in Uganda.

Data from the 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey was used to identify possible socio-economic inequalities in stunting among 3941 children aged 6-59 months. Multivariate binary logistic regression models were fitted to calculate the odds ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals for stunting by maternal formal education and household wealth index.

The overall prevalence of stunting among children was 30.1%. The risk of stunting was higher among children whose mothers had no formal education (OR: 4.35; 95% CI, 2.45-7.71), attained primary (OR: 2.74 95% CI, 1.62-4.63) and secondary level education (OR: 2.30 95% CI, 1.34-3.96) compared to those whose mothers attained tertiary level education. Similarly higher risk of stunting was found among children that lived in the poorest (OR: 1.78 95% CI, 1.23-2.59), poorer (OR: 1.88; 95% CI, (1.28-2.74), middle (OR: 1.91, 95% CI, 1.31-2.77) and richer households (OR: 1.60; 95% CI, 1.10-2.32) compared to those in the richest households. Socio-economic differences in stunting among children, under five years of age, were found. Targeting stunting prevention interventions to less affluent mother-child dyads and households might be important in reducing social inequalities in stunting among children under-five years of age in Uganda.

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